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Eddy Willems Anti-Virus Consultancy International

This is Eddy Willems’ official and original homepage for anti-virus and anti-malware consultancy with links to most anti-malware sites and companies in the world.

This site is the reference in independent anti-malware advice and information. It is also known as the first Belgian anti-virus page and one of the oldest anti-malware sites on the Web. This site is completely renewed in September 2010 and exists since 1995. Within these pages you will find one of the most comprehensive lists of anti-malware sites in the world with over 4000 links.

I have been working in the past (over 2 decades) as Anti-Malware Technology Expert for the security industry ( NOXS (a Westcon Group Company), McAfee, TrendMicro and Symantec ) and as Security Evangelist for Kaspersky Lab . I am now working as Security Evangelist for G Data Software AG . I am a Belgian security expert who is member of most international security and malware organisations in the world. I am the first and only in Belgium being on the board of three ( EICARAMTSO and LSEC) international security organisations at the same time. Find more about me at the ‘about me’ page for a more detailed bio.

Take also a look at my Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube channel or iTunes channel. Don’t forget to subscribe to my popular anti-malware Blog with continuous updates and to take a look at my new Blog and my press page with over 1000 interviews and articles.

This site is and will remain always completely independent! (Site Design: Sonia Auger and Eddy Willems)

Cybergefahr – The German (and updated) version of my book Cybergevaar released!

Famous German publisher Springer launched ‘Cybergefahr’ in the D-A-CH countries, a book written by Eddy Willems, G DATA’s Security Evangelist.

This blog article was originally posted on the G DATA Security Blog and includes an interview with me.

As the boundaries between the real world and the virtual world become blurred, the Internet is turning into a stamping ground for cyber criminals. They are using targeted malicious activities to cause untold damage to private individuals, companies or even entire governments of a country. Internationally renowned security expert Eddy Willems has set himself the target of enlightening company managers, politicians, government representatives and end users to this – and not just in the IT sector. Once equipped with the necessary knowledge, readers of the Springer book on cyber threats are able to recognise dangers in the digital world and protect themselves against cyber attacks. The book does not presume any prior knowledge – whether the solutions needed are for PCs, smartphones or entire company networks.

“It would be nice if we could make the world a little bit safer and at the same time make life a little bit harder for cyber criminals with this book,” says Willems in his introduction to the book. However, no IT system is basically immune to these risks. Both Windows and Apple devices have become victims of malevolent malware. But in the opinion of the expert, professionals disagree as to when the first computer virus was actually born. Some say it was Creeper, the first worm in an experimental program dating from 1971. However, it might also be Elk Cloner, which was only recognised as a virus many years after it was discovered. The only certain thing, says Willems, is that “the distribution of malware initially took place at a snail’s pace, moving from computer to computer via diskette; but with the introduction of the worldwide web, things rapidly intensified in terms of speed and the number of cyber victims.”

This book is an updated and translated version of Willems’ original Dutch book ‘Cybergevaar’ (“Cyberdanger” in English), originally published by Lannoo, in October 2013, in Belgium and the Netherlands. “Writing a book about cyber threats in a comprehensible and comprehensive way is not an easy task, but the book ‘Cybergevaar ‘ succeeds in this”, certifies the book’s first review, conducted by a well-known Belgian IT magazine, Datanews. Another review by the known Virus Bulletin magazine is referencing it as ‘a pleasant read on an important subject’.

(more…)

Internet of (Things) Trouble … the continuing story

Is the IoT industry making the same mistakes again?

A half year ago I wrote about the expected problems related to IoT. And guess what? Unfortunately we were right. It even became worse in the past 6 months. Nearly everything what was described back then became exploited. And that’s not a good thing.

The Car Industry

Especially all hacked cars made it into the latest newsflashes from online news media to the biggest media broadcasters in the world. Some examples were the Fiat Chrysler where 1.4 million cars were called back after the vendors Jeep hack and a Corvette where the brakes of the car could be remotely controlled. These examples confirmed the problems related to the whole car industry described in our former blog (e.g. The BMW problems).

The Fitness Industry

Completely different but fully related to the Internet of Things are the new wristbands, step counters or mobile fitness devices and the data they gather in-the-cloud and on the device and your smartphone. Interesting was the test performed by AV-Test, a worldwide well known independent test organization for security products. This test tried to measure how the private fitness data is transferred from the devices to the smartphones or the cloud and how secure the apps of fitness trackers are. You can find the full test here. These new fitness wristbands are very popular and it is already a trend; all activity results are recorded and analyzed in an app on the user’s smartphone. This means it is possible to immediately see how well the user performed. The question remains, however, is the data transported securely from the wristband to the user’s smartphone? Or is it possible for someone to intercept this link, copying or even manipulating the data? Or could the app itself be manipulated? Those questions were investigated, where 9 fitness wristbands or trackers together with the corresponding Android apps were monitored in live operation. How well performed those trackers in terms of security? And what about eavesdropping? (more…)

The AV community mourns for Klaus Brunnstein

The Viren-Test-Center’s founder passed away in May 2015, at the age of 77.

Brunnstein was born in Cologne and later on based in Hamburg. Working at the University of Hamburg, he influenced the computer science education worldwide. He will for sure be remembered by many colleagues, family and friends.

Picture of Klaus Brunnstein (*25.5.1937 - +19.05.2015)


A man we all will miss!

Klaus was one of the founders of CARO (the Computer Anti-Virus Research Organization), an organization that was established in 1990 to research and study malware. CARO was planning to create another official and public organization called EICAR, an organization aiming at antivirus research and improving development of security software. It was during the inaugural meeting of EICAR in Brussels, Belgium in 1991 that I’ve met Klaus for the first time.

While talking to Klaus, I got to learn about so many new aspects of viruses and that made me being even more interested in this whole matter. Some of his ideas were very controversial while some others, on the contrary, were even very conservative. His ideas inspired me in a lot of security related topics, events and publications I touched, visited and launched afterwards. At least you could say that, without Klaus and my first encounter with a Trojan horse, back in 1989, I wouldn’t have been into the security industry at all.

I still remember Klaus from his interesting discussions and points of view on a closed security forum. Actually, I still have all of his feedback in my backup system. Some of these old mails range back 19 years! I always stayed in contact with Klaus and I have met him during many security related events like the early EICAR conferences in the nineties.

During one of the latest CARO workshops, I told him about a book that I was writing and he told me that he always would be there in case I needed some advice. For that reason, I asked him, several months ago, to write an opinion chapter about the future of security for my book, called “Cyber Danger” (the German version “Cybergefahr” will be published later this year). I now do realize, that this will most probably be the last words he officially wrote in a book. Klaus will always be remembered as a pioneer. I am greatly saddened to have learned of his death yesterday. He contributed so much to the industry.

Klaus, I still owe you a copy of my book! Somewhere. Sometime.